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January 2015 Archives

Can I Get Credit For Time Served in Colorado?

In our last blog we talked about how to calculate parole eligability based on the type of conviction.  A major concern with our criminal defense clients is if they receive credit for time served.  According to C.R.S. 17-22.5-403 (2); If the date of offense is between July 1, 1987 and June 30, 2004, and you have one or no priors, you are eligible to earn credit for time served after you serve 75% of your sentence. 

Parole Eligibility Date Calculation

Parole is defined as "the provisional release of a prisoner who agrees to certain conditions prior to the completion of the maximum sentence period". In Colorado, "Parole is a condition of release from prison, made by an independent seven-member board appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Colorado Senate" (doc.state.co.us). Calculating parole differs when you are convicted of a violent crime. 

Why Did I Get Charged With a Crime?

Often we have clients confused how they are charged with a crime when they were not actively involved with the crime itself.  The answer, they are charged under the theory of complicity.  Colorado has enacted the statute of complicity stating, "A person is legally accountable as principal for the behavior of another constituting a criminal offense if, with the intent to promote or facilitate the commission of the offense, he or she aids, abets, advises, or encourages the other person in the planning or committing the offense." C.R.S 18-1-603

How sending marijuana from Colorado can get you in trouble

As some will argue, one of the perks to living in Colorado is the fact that residents can use marijuana both medically and recreationally with little fear of violating federal drug laws that prohibit its use. But even though we have this privilege thanks to our own state laws, this does not mean that Colorado residents are unable to break federal laws without having crossed state lines.

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